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Before anchoring 1

When you are selecting an anchoring position, make sure that it is sheltered from the wind and waves, and away from ship or boat traffic. Check the chart to determine the depth where you wish to anchor, and calculate the amount of cable you...

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Before anchoring 2

Before anchoring among other vessels, consider your boat’s swinging circle. When the wind shifts or the current changes, your boat will swing bow to the wind or current, whichever is stronger. Try to anchor your boat near boats of similar...

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Anchoring with one anchor 1

Anchoring with one anchor: On the Nautical chart, select and mark the position at which you intend to anchor. Make your approach slowly into the wind or current, whichever is stronger, to the spot you have selected. Stop the boat and drop the...

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Anchoring with one anchor 2

After anchoring, if you find that you are dragging the anchor try to let out more cable. If that doesn’t work, heave up the anchor and try to anchor somewhere else. When you want to depart the anchorage, heave up the anchor while you are...

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Anchoring with two anchors

In this lesson you will learn to anchor using two anchors. There are two popular methods that cover most situations: a) Anchoring with the anchors set 180 degrees from each other and b) anchoring with the anchors set 45 degrees off the bow...

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Anchors 45 degrees of the bow

Anchoring while you set the anchors 45 degrees off the bow. Let’s assume you select the anchoring position, and after calculations, the length of the cable you should pay out is 30 meters (98 feet) for each anchor. Make your approach slowly...

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Anchoring housekeeping

Store the anchors below deck in the anchor locker. Make sure that the anchor is well secured and tied, as a loose anchor can cause a lot of damage. Use a small fender as a wedge to protect the anchor from banging or rattling. Make sure that the...

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Tripping line

When you are berthing stern to – known as mediterranian mooring, and you have doubts concerning unknown obstructions on the seabed, or if you have to anchor in a crowded anchorage, it is better to attach a tripping line to your anchor. The...

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Introduction

Many countries throughout the world have agreed to use a uniform system of coding navigational marks. There are five types of marks which may be used in various combinations. Lateral marks indicate the port and starboard boundaries of a route to...

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Lateral marks

Lateral marks: As stated, lateral marks indicate the port and starboard boundaries of a route to be followed e.g. channel. Lateral marks differ between buoyage system A and buoyage system B. Lateral marks are usually positioned to indicate port...

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Cardinal marks, introduction

Cardinal marks indicate where the mariner may find navigable water. These marks are used in conjunction with a compass. Here we have four quadrants,: North, East, South, and West. The danger in the middle is the point of interest. From the point...

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Cardinal marks 1

Every Cardinal mark is named after the quadrant in which it is placed. Therefore, we have the North Cardinal mark, the East Cardinal mark, the South Cardinal mark, and the West Cardinal mark. The mariner is safe if he passes; north of the north...

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Cardinal marks 2

The East Cardinal mark has a shape of a pillar or spar, and is colored black with a yellow horizontal band in the middle. As a top mark it has two black cones, one above the other, base to base. The East Cardinal mark exhibits a white light with...

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Cardinal marks 3

The West Cardinal mark has a shape of a pillar or spar, and is yellow with a black horizontal band in the middle. As a top mark it has two black cones, one above the other, point to point. The West Cardinal mark, exhibits a white light with a...

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Isolated danger marks

An Isolated Danger mark indicates an isolated danger of limited extent, which has navigable water all around it. This danger might include rock, a wreck or an isolated shoal. An Isolated Danger mark has a shape of a pillar or spar, and is black...

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Safe water marks

The Safe Water mark indicates that there is navigable water all around the mark; for example in the mid – channel. A Safe Water mark has a shape of a spherical, pillar or spar, and is painted with red and white vertical stripes. As a top...

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Special marks

The Special Mark indicates a special area or feature, for example: Traffic separations, spoil grounds, cable or pipelines, to define a channel for deep draft vessels within a channel, or military exercise zones. The Special Mark may have a shape...

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New danger

The term “New Danger” is used to describe newly discovered hazards not yet shown on nautical charts. These hazards include natural obstructions, such as sandbanks or rocks, or man-made dangers such as wrecks. The new danger will be...

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Preferred channel marks

The preferred channel mark indicates where a channel divides when proceeding in the “conventional direction of buoyage”. The preferred channel mark to starboard has a shape of a can, pillar or spar, and is red with one green...

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