Monthly Archives: March 2015

Immersion suit inspection

To keep your immersion suit in good working condition, you should perform routine inspection every 6 months. This inspection should include the following: 1. Take the suit out, unroll it and ventilate it for 24 hours; 2. Check the inflation hose...

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Immersion suit storing

After the inspection store the suit in its own bag. Easiest way to do this is as follows: 1. Lay your suit on the floor with the zipper open, then roll the suit up from bottom to top, fold up the arms and the suit can be inserted into the storage...

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Maintenance

After you used the suit in the water rinse it firmly inside and out, remove any grease or oil with mild soap and let it dry completly. Dont dry your suit in direct sunlight or near a radiator, because the neoprene material becomes brittle! When...

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Vital preparations and checks 1

Helicopters are frequently used for Search and Rescue operations. It is important that you strictly follow the instruction of the helicopter crew, as they know when and how a rescue is safely and efficiently performed. To facilitate the rescue...

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Vital preparations and checks 2

Now check your crew. They should be dressed warmly, and if possible, have their wet suits on. Some form of head protection, such as a kayaker’s helmet would be useful. Life jackets should be worn at all times. As soon as you hear the...

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Rescue techniques 1

The rescue might take place either from the boat, from a dinghy or life raft, or from the water. If the rescue takes place from a dinghy or life raft, connect it with a 30 meter (100 foot) rope to the boat and let it drift astern. Put only one...

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Rescue techniques 2

The the rescue crew will lower a lifting strop, or if the situation allows, a winchman will be lowered to assist the survivors. If a dinghy or a life raft is not available, or the sea condition is very rough, the rescue will be carried out in the...

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Rescue techniques 3

The Hi-Line technique is used when it is too dangerous to lower the helicopter winchman directly on board. In this case, the helicopter crew lowers a weighted line down to a crew member. The sails should be lowered and any loose gear should be...

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Types sizes and shapes 1

Life rafts are constructed in various sizes and shapes. They are usually made of rubber or PVC. The life raft should be stored either in a neoprene or canvas valise or in a glass fiber container. Life rafts should be approved, such as by SOLAS...

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Types sizes and shapes 2

Life rafts come in various types. The simplest type is the rescue platform, also called PODS. PODS offer only a basic protection and should be restricted in use near shore or inshore. The canopy must be inflated manually, and no survival gear is...

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Maintenance

To keep your liferaft in good condition, have it annually overhauled by an approved life raft service station. You can do some checking and maintenance yourself check if the storage container is broken or cracked. If yes then patch it temporarly...

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Solas equipment pack 1

Let’s have a look at a SOLAS “A” equipment pack which you can find inside an ocean going raft: The pack includes Thermal protective aids, Paddles, a Manual inflation pump, a Repair kit, Repair clamps, Pressure relief valve plug...

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Solas equipment pack 2

The equipment pack also contains, Parachute rockets, Hand flares, Buoyant smoke signals, Seasickness bags, Water storage bags, a Signaling mirror, a Whistle, Anti – seasickness pills, a spare Sea anchor, and a radar reflector.

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Storage

Your raft should be easily and permanently accessible. Never tie your life raft with a rope or store it inside a boat. In case the boat sinks, the life raft would be trapped and eventually lost. To avoid losing your raft, place it in a cradle...

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Deployment

If you have time to deploy the raft before your boat sinks, release the raft manually. First release the slip hook and heave the raft over the side to leeward. Throw it overboard and haul off on the painter until the raft inflates. In the event...

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Four key words

After boarding keep these 4 keywords in mind: Cut, Stream, Close, Maintain. These are the first actions to be taken when a life raft has been boarded. Cut the painter line to free the raft from the sinking boat. Stream the sea anchor to slow down...

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Man over board

Here are the actions taken imediatelly when a person falls overboard: Shout “Man overboard” to inform the rest of the crew members. Say whether the person fell over on the starboard or the port side. Throw a lifebuoy. This provides a...

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Man over board prevention

In a man overboard situation, the skipper is responsible for taking immediate action to safely recover the person from the water. As regards any kind of emergency, preventing accidents should be the ultimate goal of the entire crew. As the old...

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