Monthly Archives: January 2015

Entrepreneurship 102

Entrepreneurship 102

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General

Aids to navigation include lighthouses, beacons, buoys, towers, floating aids and permanent structures. These are all man-made devices that can be used to warn of a danger, to mark a location, or to indicate a safe route. Aids to navigation are...

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Lighthouses and beacons

A Lighthouse is a major structure equipped with a light on top, with particular characteristics of the light that vary from lighthouse to lighthouse. The structure has distinctive color, shape and specified height . Many lighthouses are equipped...

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Lists and corrections

To become acquainted with the latest significant changes to lights and fog signals, e.g. light vessels, light structures, light buoys, etc., you have to consult the List of Lights and Fog Signals or the Yachtsman’s Almanac. These...

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Bouys

Buoys are floating aids to navigation. They may have the shape of a cone, can, pillar, spar or sphere, have numbers or letters or both. They have a distinguishing color, and a top mark if any, and they also have a characteristic light. They may...

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Buoyage system 1

There are two major types of buoyage systems: the lateral system and the cardinal. In the Lateral system the buoys indicate the port and starboard boundaries of a route to be followed e.g. a channel. The Lateral system differs between buoyage...

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Buoyage system 2

Other Buoys that are used to indicate isolated dangers, having navigable water around them, are known as Isolated Danger Buoys. Buoys used to indicate the location of navigable water surrounding their position, e.g. middle channel, are known as...

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Calculating luminious range

Calculating the Luminous range of a light. Let’s say the nominal range of light “X”, extracted from the Yachtsmans Almanac is 20 nautical miles, and the existing visibility is 11 nautical miles. What we want to find out here is...

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